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Friday, December 7

  1. page Our Last Class edited Carissimi, This last page exists to add a bit of Vergilian “trivia” and to wish you a fond farewe…
    Carissimi,
    This last page exists to add a bit of Vergilian “trivia” and to wish you a fond farewell.
    I. Trivia
    A continuation of the Aeneid (a thirteenth book also known as the Supplementum) was written by Mafeo Vegio (1407-1458) as a kind poetic virtuoso showpiece, it seems to me. The Latin text exists somewhere in cyberspace and there is a lovely little book edited by the eminent Virgilian Michael Putnam, which includes not only “Aeneid XIII” but other short epics perhaps of interest to students of Homer and Vergil. [Mafeo Vegio, Short Epics. I Tatti Renaissance Library.(Harvard University Press)]
    II.Farewell:
    Yes. The road goes on and on:
    Hic locus est, partes ubi se via findit in ambas:
    Aeneid VI.540
    Memory takes us back again:
    forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit.
    Aeneid I.203
    I will never forget our time studying Vergil together. Thank you for that precious gift.
    Fortunatus magister ego.

    (view changes)
    5:06 am

Friday, September 7

  1. page Our First Class edited I. Readings in the Aeneid Notate Bene: An easy and logical way to begin would be to read Book I…

    I. Readings in the Aeneid
    Notate Bene: An easy and logical way to begin would be to read Book I of the Aeneid in English, perhaps informing it with Professor Boyd's helpful guide, Introduction, pp. xxvi-xxviii ("Characters and Plot"). The suggestions below for some further reading are only suggestions: you have more than a few Latin hexameters to read, o Whippersnappers and:
    Interea tempus fugit!

    The best foundation would be a reading of books i-vi in English. Indeed the first ("Odyssean") half of the Aeneid has received more attention over the centuries than the "Iliadic" second half (books vii-xii) and most of our readings are drawn from books i-vi.
    The complete list of our readings appears on the page "Latin Readings", but for our first meeting the Latin texts which we will examine are:
    (view changes)
    11:50 am

Monday, August 20

  1. page home edited Our Goals The themes of foundation and identity - among many which Vergil articulates

    Our Goals
    The themes of foundation and identity - among many which Vergil articulates
    (view changes)
    5:42 am

Saturday, August 18

  1. 6:50 pm
  2. page home edited ... Barbara Weiden Boyd, Vergil’s Aeneid: Selections from books 1,2,4,6,10 & 12. (2nd edition…
    ...
    Barbara Weiden Boyd, Vergil’s Aeneid: Selections from books 1,2,4,6,10 & 12.
    (2nd edition). Bolchazy-Carducci (orig. 2004).
    Schoenhof'sCopies are now available at the Information Desk at Schoenhof's Foreign Books,
    While there are many excellent editions of the Aeneid this one is especially useful for our purposes since it is a text intended for the Advanced Placement Examination in Latin Literature (Vergil) for which students prepare by reading about 1,800 lines of the Aeneid, many of the same passages which we will read in books i-vi. Here is a passage chosen (almost) at random:
    {BarbaraExemplar.jr.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:47 pm
  3. page home edited Our Goals The themes of foundation and identity - among many which Vergil articulates ... Ba…

    Our Goals
    The themes of foundation and identity - among many which Vergil articulates
    ...
    Barbara Weiden Boyd, Vergil’s Aeneid: Selections from books 1,2,4,6,10 & 12.
    (2nd edition). Bolchazy-Carducci (orig. 2004).
    Schoenhof's Foreign Books, 76 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge.
    While there are many excellent editions of the Aeneid this one is especially useful for our purposes since it is a text intended for the Advanced Placement Examination in Latin Literature (Vergil) for which students prepare by reading about 1,800 lines of the Aeneid, many of the same passages which we will read in books i-vi. Here is a passage chosen (almost) at random:
    {BarbaraExemplar.jr.jpg}
    (view changes)
    6:42 pm

Wednesday, August 15

  1. page Our First Class edited ... [Joseph Farrell, “The Virgilian intertext” in The Cambridge Companion to Virgil. Cambridge Uni…
    ...
    [Joseph Farrell, “The Virgilian intertext” in The Cambridge Companion to Virgil. Cambridge University Press. 1997.]
    The Homeric poems are monumental and somewhat forbidding, but a way of beginning a comparative study might be to focus on fundamental thematic parallels:
    ...
    the Sibyl himself journeysundertakes the passage to Hades
    • The Iliad: The second half of the Aeneid deepens the typological link between Aeneas and Achilles, both goddess-born heroes who seek and attain a terrible vengeance for the loss of a dear companion. It is worth reading the end of the Iliad (book xxiv) with its transcendently beautiful recognition and recociliation of Priam and Achilles, and the horrific contrast with the "corresponding" scene which ends the Aeneid.
    (view changes)
    2:12 pm
  2. page English Translations edited I. Some English Versions of the Aeneid: ... and still (I (I hope) in Cecil Day-Lewis, Th…

    I. Some English Versions of the Aeneid:
    ...
    and still (I
    (I
    hope) in
    Cecil Day-Lewis, The Aeneid of Virgil. Anchor Books. 1952
    David West, Vergil, The Aeneid. Penguin. 1990.
    (view changes)
    2:08 pm
  3. page Course Description edited {WikiVergMosaic.jpg} Foundation and Identity: A Reading of Vergil’s Aeneid ... intricate use …
    {WikiVergMosaic.jpg}
    Foundation and Identity: A Reading of Vergil’s Aeneid
    ...
    intricate use of allusion to
    It is also a poem filled with contradiction, loss, and grief. Aeneas, the paragon of Roman pietas, finds himself caught up in of conflicting claims and himself becomes a victim of a kind of moral “entropy”, embodied in the Aeneid by the rage of the goddess Juno.
    Our reading of Vergil in English will focus on a series of short crucial passages in Latin which will help us see the nature of Vergil’s poetic art and appreciate his attempt to create a true “national epic” for the reborn Roman world.
    (view changes)
    2:07 pm

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